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Rebuilding Place in the Urban Space

"A community’s physical form, rather than its land uses, is its most intrinsic and enduring characteristic." [Katz, EPA] This blog focuses on place and placemaking and all that makes it work--historic preservation, urban design, transportation, asset-based community development, arts & cultural development, commercial district revitalization, tourism & destination development, and quality of life advocacy--along with doses of civic engagement and good governance watchdogging.

Tuesday, March 21, 2006

A tougher than normal move

Saving a historic home - baltimoresun.com.jpgA broken axle on one of the trailers supporting the home left it stranded in a field near the end of its journey this morning. Workers planned to return with a replacement part later today in the hope that the house could be taken the last half-mile or so across the field to its destination. (Sun photo by Doug Kapustin) Mar. 21, 2006

Today's Baltimore Sun has this story, "Historic house transport hits a snag: Broken axle delays overnight move of Victorian-era Clarksville home " about the moving of a historic house in Howard County, Maryland. The Sun article has six photos of the move.

I believe that rather than demolish historic buildings, when they can be moved, they should be. From the standpoint sustainability and wise use of resources, demolition makes no sense. Just because it's not quite so simple doesn't mean that it shouldn't be done. Furthermore, as a matter of course, PUD applications shouldn't even be considered if the developer does anticipatory demolition, and PUD agreements should require the movement of buildings otherwise to be destroyed.
100_3114Buildings eligible for listing on the DC Inventory of Historic Sites and the National Register for Historic Places being turned to dust in northeast Washington, DC.


baltimoresun.com - Houselift.gifBaltimore Sun graphic.

I will admit that it's much harder to move a brick house. But it can be done, or at the very least the house can be deconstructed. It's likely that most brick houses in DC can't be moved intact over bridges, etc.

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